Port St Mary – 5th June 2020

With bad weather forecast for the weekend, this was the last chance for a good stroll. Even so, it was very very windy, a dress rehearsal for the weekend’s weather.

This four mile walk would take me on three footpaths I haven’t been on in the 6 years I have lived here, and all a stone’s throw from home.

Taking Truggan Road again, I turned off this time before the bend and Glendown Farm, taking a lane northwards between the houses which led up the hill passing a couple of houses with spectacular views of Port Erin – this was my first new path. I joined a second path that I have taken many times before which like many other paths take one to the Howe, just below the chapel. I turned left to take the road to Glen Chass and on leaving the village I took a shortcut on a second new path on the left which leads to the top end of Fistard through a very pleasant field. It is surprising how different a place seems when you see if from a different angle. There are some really lovely quaint cottages in this village, many having super views across Perwick Bay. It has a quiet unspoilt feel to it.

View from one of the cottages towards Port Erin
View towards Glen Chass /Perwick

Walking through the village, I followed the road down to the top of the golf course, which looked rather dry. Our island has been rain-free for months to such an extent that a hosepipe ban is being introduced tonight. On reaching the cliff top I decided to take my third new footpath down to the beach. The tide was out and the landscape again looked quite dramatic. Other people have described this as a steep path, but it is quite simple really and if you must have a rest there is a bench towards the top. I spent a happy few minutes watching butterflies on this path, as you will see in the later slideshow.

Port St Mary Golf Course

Keeping to the top of the cliff, I arrived in Port St Mary and pottered about on the very extensive rocky beach. Many times you wouldn’t know these rocks are there, as the tide comes right up to the grassy shoreline, but today the tide was right out. There were some interesting rock formations and the seashells made strange groupings on the rocks as if to protect themselves. They looked as if each little family grouping was social distancing from their neighbour. There were some wonderful colours made by the different seaweeds and sea anemones. The rock pools were quite deep and clear so the animals could be seen in full view without having to fish around and move seaweed to see them. There was also a lot of evidence of what I think are coral fossils.

Perwick Bay

Once I finished messing about on the beach, it was a matter of strolling home along the outskirts of Port St Mary, taking the underway as far as I could – it is one way to allow social distancing, in the opposite direction to one that I was walking – then following the main road to Four Roads before veering left down the lane and footpaths over the fields back to Port Erin.

Rock Pools at Port St Mary
Social Distancing Shells

This was only a short 4 mile walk, but it felt more because of the variety of interest that it provided. There are so many short walks in the south of the island. Tomorrow or Sunday I may visit Scarlett or Langness or possibly the Carnanes, unless the weather is really wet and windy, in which case I may just stay in bed!

In case I haven’t already told you, we have had three days now with zero cases and all who developed Covid-19 have now recovered. We know we will get cases from time to time but we will be able to manage any infections that occur. Well done to the Manx people and the Manx government. Shows what can be done with border closures and constant Contact, Track and Trace which we have implemented from Day 1 of our first case.

Nature Walk including Colby and Glen Chass – 5.65 miles, 432 ft of ascent

I make no apologies for describing today’s walk as a nature ramble. That was what I set out to do. I haven’t visited my haven so far this year and the orange tips won’t be around much longer. I always draw such warmth from my hidden nature reserve – hidden to all but locals walking their dogs, walkers and children escaping from their parents. It is not shown on a map and as far as I know, it doesn’t have a name – and long may it stay that way and let nature run wild.

I took the bus to Colby, then took the path beside the Colby river. There is so much to see in this first third of a mile. They were butterflies flitting, but above all numerous wild flowers abutting the water course, oblivious to the fact that there are houses on the other side of the river.

 

Above: The start of the walk from Colby.

Below: Nature in all its glory in the first mile of the walk

 

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Crossing the railway line, I interrupted the sheep’s pleasure and seemed to cause some dismay as a few of them started coughing violently. This is pasture land where sheep share the territory with birds rather than wild flowers. I soon cross back over the river and enter into my little paradise. It isn’t much to look at, but if you listen you can hear the birds chirping to each other trees, and if you stop and stare, you can watch the butterflies chattering with their companion as they move incessantly on the path. The plants in flower offer their shade and their nectar to the local inhabitants and everything is in harmony.

Passing out of the nature reserve I make my way along the road to the Shore Inn. I debated with myself whether to stop and have a cider but decided against it, and instead I sat on the beach, drank my water and ate an odd selection of banana, raw carrot, cucumber and a very small chocolate bar. The birds surrounding me were mainly herring gulls and blackbacked gulls, with a few oystercatchers at the sea edge and a solitary shag perched on a rock. The tide is way out, further than I have ever seen it. It is almost that time of year when the intrepid venture out into Douglas Bay and slip and slide their way to the Tower of Refuge.

I walked around the coast to Port St Mary, along the Underway and out towards the outer harbour before turning westwards towards Fistard. Here I had a choice of direction and not having walked along Glenn Chass stream since I moved here five years ago, I took this route uphill. It didn’t disappoint. The bluebells are still out and are vibrant dark blue. There are still smattering of wild garlic too. As that conjures smells, I am reminded that as I went round Gansey Point. the meadowsweet was in full bloom and the scent was quite overpowering.

Above: The meadowsweet at Gansey Point; the extended beach at Chapel Bay; different types of footprints;  stranded boats at Port St. Mary.

From Glen Chass I followed one of the higher paths across meadows back towards Port Erin. I am particularly pleased with the photograph I took of the Milner Tower on Bradda Head standing on top of a stile just before I descended down the Golden Road, which right now is blue from head to toe.

The final stretch: photos of the gorgeous Glenn Chass,

and home…. altogether, I saw at least 5 of our 19 species of butterfly: red admiral, wall brown, green-veined white, orange tip and speckled wood.

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A most enjoyable three hours. My next walk is planned for Sunday or Monday, when I hope to walk from Douglas to Castletown.