Ballaglass Glen with the U3A – 7th Sept 2021

With visitors from the UK over for a week, this was the ideal introductory walk to show them a part of the island that they might not otherwise see. Indeed it did seem to take an age to get there down the twisting roads in the valley around Maughold, not helped by my missing a turning earlier on. It takes about 45 mins from Port Erin.

It is always a very green area, maintained well by the local farmers and with some stunning countryside. It is some time since I have been to Ballaglass Glen, certainly well before our first lockdown. We met our U3A group, all people well known to me, and my family visitors were delighted by the warm reception they received.

The route follows a recognised track pretty much all the way to the coast, through beautiful woodland that goes above the Glen itself. There are a few ups and downs but by and large it is a very straightforward path. As you descend to the mouth of the small river, the area opens up into some fine wetlands. It is a great place for either lunch on the beach or throwing pebbles into the river or sea, which themselves have been thrown up by the sea over centuries. It is quiet and peaceful here, though surprisingly busy for an arbitrary Tuesday, though I was reminded it was the last day of the school holidays which may account for the numbers of families there today.

The route follows a minor road uphill for almost a mile until we take another even more minor road to the right which will ultimately take us off road for 300 metres to Cashtal Yn Ard (Castle of the Heights), a site of archeaological interest. It is a group of impressive standing stones that have stood here for the best part of 4000 years. It was originally a lot larger, one of the biggest megaliths in the whole of the British Isles, being 130 ft long, and containing 5 chambered cairns in a ‘horned barrow’. It is thought it may originally have been for a chieftain, and then over time it has become a communal burial ground for his lucky family. As with many of these ancient sites, one has to imagine it completely covered with turf and soil with a majestic entrance at one end, in this case, the west end where there still stands two mighty stones which would have been the archway into the inner sanctum.

This was our lunch spot with tremendous views over the North Barrule on the western side and the sea on the eastern side.

From here, we carried on along the same road in the northerly direction until we came to the wooded stream that is Ballaglass Glen again. There are a couple of wonderful houses nestling in this glen, and one kindly has a permissive path that allows visitors to walk among the trees inside the glen and enjoy the mini and greater waterfalls along this short distance back to the car. There are a number of paths so don’t take the first one that goes off to the right as you will miss some of the wonderful views if you do.

This is a short walk of just about 4 miles with a maximum height around Cashtal Yn Ard of about 150 metres ( just under 500ft). You only need 90mins – 2 hrs to simply do the walk, so a pleasant morning or afternoon stroll for anyone.